Colors

The colors you choose for your design system are more than just an extension of your brand.

A UI uses color to convey:

  • Feedback: Error and success states
  • Information: Charts, graphs, and wayfinding elements
  • Hierarchy: Showing structured order through color and typography

Common colors in a design system include 1–3 primaries that represent your brand. If none of these work well as a link and button color, then you may have an extra color for that as well. It’s a good idea to use the same color for links and button backgrounds as it makes it easier for users to recognize interactive elements.

You’ll likely have neutrals for general UI backgrounds and borders—usually grays. And finally, you’ll have colors for states such as error, warning, and success. We group these colors to see how well they work together and refine as needed.

 

Depending on how strict you want to be with your palette, you may want to include a range of tints—a color mixed with white—and shades—a color mixed with black. Sometimes you may use other colors instead of white or black to avoid muddiness, such as an orange to darken a yellow so it doesn’t appear brown.

These color variations allow designers to have choices. But be warned, having too many choices can lead to major design inconsistencies. Keep your inclusion of tints, shades, and neutral palettes slim to prevent misuse of the system while still giving designers the flexibility they need. You can always add more colors as you find the need.

Reference
https://programmingdesignsystems.com/color/a-short-history-of-color-theory/index.html#a-short-history-of-color-theory-xZzRFOZ

https://uxdesign.cc/building-a-design-system-where-to-start-part-2-colour-54fbe9b76d85